TIRK014
Fujiya & Miyagi
"Collarbone"

Fujiya & Miyagi formed not playing Sunday League football.
With playing talents described as, at best, enthusiastic, at worst, dangerous, Steve Lewis and David Best spent a lot of time warming the bench together. Chatting through their fourth straight home defeat of the season they discovered a shared interest in mid-seventies Krautrock and early-nineties electronica.
Pretty soon they both realised that wet Sunday afternoons were maybe better spent making music rather than cheering along from the sidelines. Combining their own considerable musical talents, they invested in some stolen software, a laptop, some borrowed guitar effects and a £10 Farfisa from Brighton Sunday market. With this, some tinkering, some practices and more than the odd bout of swearing - Steve (Guitar / Vocals / Fujiya) and David (Electronic /Keyboards / Miyagi) - Fujiya & Miyagi was born.
Pretty soon the pair began releasing a series of esoteric, electronic mini masterpieces on 12”. Following enthusiastic endorsement of these early singles from the likes of Tiga, Andrew Weatherall and Christian Vogel, the pair decided to forged ahead with an album. Released late 2002, their debut, “Electro-Karaoke in the Negative Style”, showcased a song based take on the prevalent laptop-tronica sound of the time. Garnering 4 and 5 star reviews (Jockey Slut, Sleazenation, DJ, XRAY, Musik), Electro Karaoke was described, by NME, as “a succulent but soulful take on all things electronica”.
Live shows soon followed, with slots supporting the likes of Goldfrapp, Ladytron and Super Collider. Although well received the pair soon saw the limitations of laptop-as-on-stage-entertainment. Just as importantly they heard the possibilities in a more ambitious approach firsthand. They’d need to take things further.
Cue the arrival of Matt. Matt Hainsby plays bass, wears tight jeans, and long sleeved white and black striped Breton t-shirts. Basically, Matt is the spit and sound of a young Jean Jacques Burnel. Together the three of them regrouped to the studio. Pretty soon they’d arrived at a new, heavier take on their original sound. Still electronic, still songs, but electronic songs imbued with bite and beauty. Hearing these new demos a friend commented that the new F&M were like “Can meets Talking Heads meets Happy Mondays meets Kraftwerk, but, well, not really, cause you're all from Hove. KrautPop not KrautRock, that's it!'
Taking this sorta good but slightly weird compliment as advice to get out on the road more, the band began looking for dates. Unbelievably they found an unlikely ally and fan in one time Can legend, Damo Suzuki. Damo’d been passed their demo through a long series of friends meeting friends meeting friends and invited them to support him on tour. It was at one of these Damo show that they came to the attention of Tirk, the new label from nuphonic. Fans of their early releases but enthused by their new direction Tirk were more than keen to hear more.

1. Collarbone
2. Cassettesingle